Syria / Travel

The Umayyad Mosque of Damascus, Syria

The Minaret of Qaitbay as seen from the outside of the Umayyad Mosque…

umayyad mosque damascus

Considered the first monumental work of architecture in Islamic history, the Umayyad Mosque (also called the Great Mosque of Damascus) is a melting pot of different faiths. It houses the mausoleum of John the Baptist — which is said to contain his head — as well as the tomb of Hussein ibn Ali, a grandson of the Prophet Mohammed and an important figure in the Shiite tradition. Its rectangular layout, Roman arches, and Corinthian columns became a prototype for mosques around the Islamic world, influencing structures from Cairo to Istanbul.

umayyad mosque damascus

After the Umayyad conquest of Damascus in the Seventh century, the Umayyad Mosque was constructed on the site where a Byzantine church, a Roman temple, and before that an Aramean temple to the god of thunder and rain once stood more than 3,000 years ago.

umayyad mosque damascus

During his reign as caliph in the eighth century, it is said that al-Walid ibn Abd al-Malik addressed Damascenes thusly: “Inhabitants of Damascus, four things give you marked superiority over the rest of the world: your climate, your water, your fruits, and your baths. To these I wanted to add a fifth: this mosque.”

umayyad mosque damascus

The prayer hall inside the Umayyad Mosque:

umayyad mosque damascus

In sanctity, the Umayyad Mosque is second only to the holy mosques of Mecca and Medina:

umayyad mosque damascus

Heading for one of the exits:

umayyad mosque damascus

About these ads

3 thoughts on “The Umayyad Mosque of Damascus, Syria

  1. Pingback: Visiting Damascus, Syria | The Velvet Rocket

  2. Beautiful pictures, but pls note the prophet’s grandson Husein ibn Ali is NOT buried here. He has a shrine in Karbala Iraq, where he was martyred.

    • Well, it isn’t that simple. Part of his body is buried in Karbala, but his head is found at the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus. So, I suppose we’re both right…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s