Ethiopia / Places We Go

Lake Tana, Ethiopia

Lake Tana is Ethiopia’s largest, covering over 3,500 square kilometers, and its waters are the source of the Blue Nile, which flows 5, 223 kilometers north to the Mediterranean Sea.

Lounging lakeside and watching squadrons of pelicans skirting the surface might be the most relaxing way to pass the time here, but your editor gets restless very easily and that just wouldn’t suit him. And so, soon after arriving, he and his Italian were out exploring.

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Perhaps the first thing that one will notice on visiting Lake Tana’s shoreline is the fact that the lake is indeed quite large:

lake tana

In fact, unless one is in an inlet (such as the inlet pictured below), one will not be able to see the lake’s islands or any of its other shorelines:

lake tana

Some Lake Tana shoreline scenes:

lake tana

Papyrus – probably destined for use in constructing the tankwa canoes used by the locals:

lake tana

lake tana

lake tana

Some of the trees surrounding the lake are extraordinary:

lake tana

lake tana

Sunset on Lake Tana:

lake tana

lake tana

Crossing Lake Tana… Legions of boat operators line the shores of Lake Tana in places like Bahir Dar and so one will have no trouble at all securing transportation around the lake:

lake tana

Taken from our boat – I told you it was a big lake:

lake tana

Some of the smaller islands on the lake… A few are inhabited, but most are in their natural state:

lake tana

One of the ferries crossing Lake Tana:

lake tana

I’ve talked about the tankwa canoes before and below are some additional examples… To recap for you – the canoes are made out of papyrus and although they may look flimsy, they are quite durable and can carry massive loads.

I took these pictures near a village on the edge of Lake Tana:

lake tana

lake tana

lake tana

For thousands of years these boats have been used to traverse the waterways of Africa – they have not changed a bit in all that time.

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5 thoughts on “Lake Tana, Ethiopia

  1. I was interesting visiting Lake Tana, even though you should mention about the greed of the church. They ALWAYS find a way to rip you off and ask you for money. You tell me how could be possible that I have to pay for entering a church, practically seen as Jesus Christ’s home?! I am not sure God would approve…

  2. Pingback: Bahir Dar, Ethiopia « The Velvet Rocket

  3. Pingback: Bahir Dar War Memorial « The Velvet Rocket

  4. Pingback: The Monasteries of Lake Tana – Ura Kidane Mehiret « The Velvet Rocket

  5. Pingback: The Blue Nile Outlet | The Velvet Rocket

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