Art

Photos Of The Day: Gold Mining In Burkina Faso

The landscape of Séguénéga in Burkina Faso, a commune in the north of the west African country, is suffering considerable environmental damage because of a massive increase in gold mining:

The landscape of Séguénéga in Burkina Faso, a commune in the north of the west African country, is suffering considerable environmental damage because of the increase in gold mining

The miners:

gold-mining-burkina-faso

The mining managers choose men to dig. Each bag of stones the men dig up is theirs to keep, but they have to agree to a price per bag before they can go down and start working:

The mining managers choose men to dig. Each bag of stones the men dig up is theirs to keep, but they have to agree a price per bag before they can go down and start work

The stones are then washed and passed to the grinders:

The stones are then washed and passed to the grinders

Women sweep up the dust from the process and pan it for any gold that might have been missed:

Women sweep up the dust from the process and pan it for any gold that might have been missed

The men work six days a week. The mines are closed on Friday. Friday is panning day and pay day:

The men work six days a week. The mines are closed on Friday. Friday is panning day and pay day

One form of environmental damage connected to the mining is that trees are cut down to line the tunnels of the mines. So many trees have been cut down, in fact, that miners often must travel more than thirty miles away from the mines in order to find any trees left to cut:

Trees are cut down to line the tunnels of the mines

One result of so many trees being cut down is extensive wind erosion (which, among other concerns, is devastating for agriculture):

wind-erosion

Some villagers near the mines in Burkina Faso:

Photograph Jose Navarro-Tree Aid

***

The above photographs are courtesy of Jose Navarro for Tree Aid

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3 thoughts on “Photos Of The Day: Gold Mining In Burkina Faso

  1. An HONEST campaign to plant new trees and nurture them until they can survive on their own could be a solution. You see “Honest” is an important word here, otherwise many NGOs run ghost campaigns in poor countries that do little or no good to originally targeted audience.
    Looks like you’re on a speed writing spree, keeping up with you is getting harder. Good job :).

  2. I think the same as Naeem Akram, plant trees against the desert. The Bukinabés? should fight against corruption, and should retake the ideas of Thomas Sankara, exept his communistic plans. But nice pics for poor people. Plant a wall of trees for better live!

  3. really tragic happens once the impact of mining on the environment that they do, Is the local government does not give them an education or guidance on natural resources they occupy for example by working together how best to develop steps that mining is more friendly to the ecosystem in the mining environment

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